Inhaled treprostinil beneficial in pulmonary hypertension

Inhaled treprostinil improves exercise capacity in patients with pulmonary hypertension due to interstitial lung disease, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Aaron Waxman, M.D., Ph.D., from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues enrolled patients with interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension in a randomized […]

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Cochlear implants aid speech recognition in most adults

Most adult patients have statistically significant postoperative improvements in speech recognition after receiving cochlear implants, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. James R. Dornhoffer, M.D., from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, and colleagues assessed changes in preoperative aided versus postoperative speech recognition scores for […]

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Accurate predictions of ovarian cancer outcome possible with new classification system

The new, Oxford-developed method for subtyping ovarian cancer has been validated in a recent collaboration between the University of Oxford and Imperial College London. Dubbed the “Oxford Classic,” researchers have demonstrated that it enables the accurate prediction of patient disease outcome, as well as the development of new targeted cancer therapies. Researchers have discovered and […]

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Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers from the University of Cambridge, the University of Milan and Google Research have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds. They found that when amyloid beta, a key protein implicated in Alzheimer’s disease, adopts a highly disordered shape, […]

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Discrimination may increase risk of anxiety disorders regardless of genetics, study finds

Exposure to discrimination plays a significant role in the risk of developing anxiety and related disorders, even—in a first—after accounting for potential genetic risks, according to a multidisciplinary team of health researchers led by Tufts University and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers determined that even after controlling for genetic risk for […]

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